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WKF Rules Appendix continued

APPENDIX 1: THE TERMINOLOGY
APPENDIX 2: GESTURES AND FLAG SIGNALS
ANNOUNCEMENTS AND GESTURES OF THE REFEREE
THE JUDGES FLAG SIGNALS

APPENDIX 3: OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES FOR REFEREES AND JUDGES
APPENDIX 4: SCOREKEEPERS MARKS
APPENDIX 5: LAYOUT OF THE KUMITE COMPETITION AREA
APPENDIX 6: LAYOUT OF THE KATA COMPETITION AREA
APPENDIX 7: THE COMPULSORY KATA LIST
APPENDIX 8: W.K.F. MAJOR KATA LIST
APPENDIX 9: THE KARATE GI

It should be noted that the male gender used in this text also refers to the female

 

 

 

APPENDIX 2: GESTURES AND FLAG SIGNALS

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND GESTURES OF THE REFEREE

SHOMEN-NI-REI
The Referee extends his arms palms to the front.
 

rules-new

OTAGAI-NI-REI
The Referee motions to the contestants to bow to each other.
 

rules - OTAGAI-NI-REI

SHOBU HAJIME
“Start the Match”
After the announcement, the Referee takes a step back.
 

rules-SHOBU HAJIME

YAME
“Stop”
Interruption or end of a match or bout. As he makes the announcement, the Referee makes a downward chopping motion with his hand.

rules - YAME

TSUZUKETE HAJIME
“Resume fighting—Begin”
As he says “Tsuzukete”, and standing in a forward stance, the Referee extends his arms outward with his palms facing the contestants. As he says “Hajime” he turns the palms and brings them rapidly towards one another at the same time stepping back.

rules - TSUZUKETE HAJIME

THE REFEREE’S OPINION
After calling “Yame” and using the prescribed signal the Referee indicates his preference by holding his bent arm palm upwards on the side of the scoring contestant.

rules-refsopinion

IPPON (1 point)
The Referee extends his arm downward at 45 degrees on the side of the scorer.

rules - IPPON02

NIHON (Two Points)
The Referee extends his arm at shoulder level on the side of the scorer.

rules - NIHON

SANBON (Three Points)
The Referee extends his arm upward at 45 degrees on the side of the scorer.

rules- SANBON02

CANCEL LAST DECISION
When an award or penalty has been given in error the Referee turns towards the contestant, announces “Aka” or “AO”, crosses his arms, then makes a cutting motion, palms downward, to indicate that the last decision has been cancelled.

rules - CANCEL LAST

NO KACHI (Win)
At the end of the match or bout, announcing “Aka (or AO) No Kachi” the Referee extends his arm upward at 45 degrees on the side of the winner.

rules-NO CASHI

KIKEN
“Renunciation”
The Referee points with the index finger towards the renouncing contestant's line then announces a win to the opponent.

rules - KIKKEN

SHIKKAKU
“Disqualification, Leave the Area”.
The Referee points first upwards at 45 degrees in the direction of the offender then motions out and behind with the announcement “Aka (AO) Shikkaku!” He then announces a win for the opponent.

rules - SHIKKAKU

HIKIWAKE
“Draw”
When time is up and scores are equal, or no scores have been awarded the Referee crosses his arms then extends them with the palms showing to the front.

rules - HIKIWAKE

CATEGORY 1 OFFENCE
The Referee crosses his open hands with the edge of one wrist on the edge of the other at chest level.

rules - CAT1 OFFENCE

CATEGORY 2 OFFENCE
The Referee points with a bent arm at the face of the offender.

rules - CAT2 OFFENCE

CHUKOKU
Making the appropriate signal the Referee gives a warning of a Category 1 or Category 2 offence. No penalty is issued at this time.

rules-chukoku

KEIKOKU
“Ippon Penalty”.
The Referee indicates a Category 1 or 2 offence then points with his index finger downwards at 45 degrees in the direction of the offender, and awards Ippon (one point) to the opponent.

rules - KEIKOKU

HANSOKU CHUI
“Nihon Penalty”.
The Referee indicates a Category 1 or 2 offence then points with his index finger horizontally in the direction of the offender and awards Nihon (two points), to the opponent.
 

rules - HANSOKU CHI

HANSOKU
“Disqualification”
The Referee indicates a Category 1 or 2 offence then points with his index finger upwards at 45 degrees in the direction of the offender, and awards a win to the opponent.
 

rules - HANSOKU

AIUCHI
“Simultaneous Scoring Techniques”.
No point is awarded to either contestant. The Referee brings the fists together in front of the chest.
 

rules - AIUCHI

TORIMASEN
“Unacceptable as a Scoring Technique”
The Referee crosses his arms then makes a cutting motion, palms downward. When the Referee uses this signal to the Judges followed by the signal for reconsideration it means that the technique was deficient in one or more of the six scoring criteria.
 

rules - torimashen

RECONSIDERATION
After indicating his reasons, the Referee asks the Judges to reconsider their opinions.
 

rules - RECONSIDER

AKA (AO) SCORED FIRST
The Referee indicates to the Judges that Aka scored first by bringing the open right hand to the palm of the left hand. If AO was first, the left hand points into the right hand.
 

rules - AKA SHIRO

TECHNIQUE BLOCKED OR OFF TARGET.
The Referee places an open hand over the other arm to indicate to the Judges that the technique was blocked or hit a non-scoring area.
 

rules - TEQ BLOCKED


TECHNIQUE MISSED
The Referee moves the clenched fist across the body to indicate to the Judges that the technique missed or glanced off the scoring area.
 

rules - TEQ MISSED

EXCESSIVE CONTACT
The Referee indicates to the Judges that there has been excessive contact or other Category 1 offence.
 

rules - EX CONTACT

FEIGNING OR EXAGGERATING INJURY
The Referee holds both hands to his face to indicate to the Judges a Category 2 offence.
 

rules-feigning

JOGAI
“Exit from the Match Area”
The Referee indicates an exit to the Judges, by pointing with the index finger to the match area boundaryon the side of the offender.
 

rules - JOGAI

MUBOBI (Self Endangerment)
The Referee touches his face then turning the hand edge forward, moves it back and forth to indicate to the Judges that the contestant has endangered himself.
 

rules - MUBOBI

AVOIDING COMBAT
The Referee makes a circling motion with the down turned index finger to indicate to the Judges a Category 2 offence.
 

rules-avoiding


UNNECESSARY CLINCHING, WRESTLING, PUSHING OR SEIZING WITHOUT A TECHNIQUE
The Referee holds both clenched fists at shoulder level or makes a pushing motion with both open hands to indicate to the Judges a Category 2 offence.
 

rules-cijnching

DANGEROUS AND UNCONTROLLED ATTACKS
The Referee brings his clenched fist past the side of his head to indicate to the Judges a Category 2 offence.
 

rules-dangerous

ATTACKS WITH THE HEAD KNEES OR ELBOWS
The Referee touches his forehead, knee, or elbow with the open hand to indicate to the Judges a Category 2 offence.
 

rules-headattacks

TALKING TO OR GOADING THE OPPONENT AND DISCOURTEOUS BEHAVIOUR
The Referee places his index finger to his lips to indicate to the Judges a Category 2 offence.
 

rules-talking

SHUGO
“Judges Called”
The Referee calls the Judges at the end of the match or bout: or to recommend Shikkaku.
 

rules - SHUGO

THE JUDGE’S FLAG SIGNALS

rules - IPPONflag

IPPON

rules - NIHONflags

NIHON


rules - SANBONflags

SANBON
 

rules - FOUL Flag

FOUL

Warning of a foul. The appropriate flag is waved in a circle, then a Category 1 or 2 signal is made.
 



rules - CAT1OFFENCEflags

CATEGORY 1 OFFENCE

The flags are crossed and extended with the arms straight.
 

rules - CAT2OFFENCEflags

CATEGORY 2 OFFENCE

The Judge points the flag with arm bent.
 

rules - JOGAIflags

JOGAI

The Judge taps the floor with the appropriate flag
 

rules - KEIKOKUflags

KEIKOKU

 

rules-HANSOKUflags

HANSOKU CHUI

 

rules - hansokuflags1

HANSOKU

 

rules - torimasen flags

     TORIMASEN
 

rules - aiuchiflags

AIUCHI

The flags are moved toward each other, in front of the chest.

rules - mienai flags

MIENAI

The flags are held in front of the face.

 

 

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APPENDIX 3: OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES FOR REFEREES AND JUDGES


This Appendix is intended to give assistance to Referees and Judges where there may be no obvious guidance in the Rules or Explanations.


EXCESSIVE CONTACT
When a contestant makes a scoring technique immediately followed by another which makes excessive contact the Referee Panel does not award the score and instead issues a Category 1 warning or penalty (unless it is the recipient’s own fault).

EXCESSIVE CONTACT AND EXAGGERATION
When a competitor makes a pretence of having received an excessive contact and the Referee Panel decides instead that the technique in question was controlled, satisfying all six scoring criteria, then a score will be awarded and a Category 2 warning or penalty for feigning or exaggeration will be issued. (Always taking into account that severe cases of feigning injury may warrant Shikakku.)

MUBOBI
A warning or penalty for Mubobi is given when a competitor is hit or injured through his or her own fault or negligence. This may be caused by turning their back on the opponent, attacking with a long, low gyaku tsuki chudan without regard for the opponent’s jodan counter attack, stopping fighting before the referee calls “Yamae”, dropping their guard or concentration and repeated failure or refusal to block the opponent’s attacks. Explanation XVI of Article 8 states:

Should the offender receive an excessive contact and/or sustain an injury and the fault is considered to be the recipient’s, the referee will issue a Category 2 warning or penalty and may decline to give a penalty to the opponent.

A contestant who is hit through their own fault and exaggerates the effect in order to mislead the Referee Panel may receive a warning or penalty for Mubobi as well as an additional penalty for exaggeration, since two offences have been committed.

It should be noted that there are no circumstances in which a technique that has made excessive contact can be given a score.

ZANSHIN
Zanshin is described as a state of continued commitment in which the contestant maintains total concentration, observation, and awareness of the opponent's potentiality to counter-attack. Some contestants after delivering a technique will turn their body partially away from the opponent but are still watching and ready to continue the action. The Referee Panel must be able to distinguish between this continued state of readiness and one where the contestant has turned away, dropped their guard and concentration, and in effect has ceased fighting.

CATCHING A CHUDAN KICK.
Should the Referee Panel award a score when a contestant delivers a chudan kick and the opponent then catches the leg before it can be withdrawn?

Provided that the kicking contestant maintains ZANSHIN there is no reason why this technique cannot score provided that it contains all six of the scoring criteria. After all in the case of two almost simultaneous gyaku tsukis it is normal practice to award a score to the contestant considered to have landed their technique first even though both might be considered effective. Theoretically, in a real fight scenario, a full power kick would be deemed to have disabled the opponent and therefore the leg would not be grabbed. Appropriate control, the target area, and satisfaction of all six criteria, are the deciding factors as to whether any technique can be awarded a score or not.

THROWING AND INJURIES.
Since grabbing hold of the opponent and throwing is allowed under certain conditions it is incumbent upon all coaches to ensure that their competitors are trained in and are able to use break-fall/safe landing techniques.

A competitor who attempts a throwing technique must comply with the conditions imposed in the Explanations in Article 6 and Article 8. If a competitor throws their opponent in full compliance with the stated requirements and an injury results due to the opponent failing to make a proper break-fall, then the injured party is responsible and the thrower should not be penalised. Self-caused injury can result when a contestant being thrown, instead of making a break-fall lands on an extended arm or elbow, or holds onto the thrower and pulls them down on top of themselves.

A potentially dangerous situation occurs when a contestant grabs both legs to throw the opponent on their back. The Article 8, Explanations X states that “…and the opponent must be held onto throughout, so that a safe landing can be made.” Since it is difficult to ensure a safe landing, a throw such as this may fall into the prohibited category. If an injury results this would be dealt with under Category 1. If there is no injury or the throwing process is interrupted by the Referee then a Category 2 warning or penalty could be imposed under Article 8, Category 2, Paragraph 6. It should be emphasised that this kind of throwing technique is not prohibited per se; it is the manner in which it is executed that will be the deciding factor.

THREE MIENAIS
If three Judges signal “Mienai” after the referee has stopped the bout can the Referee give a score or penalty?

Paragraph III of the Explanations in Article 12 states “However, when the bout is halted, the majority decision will prevail.” Since the Judges have seen nothing they are not considered to be offering an opinion or vote and therefore the Referee is in the majority. This situation can occur when action occurs close to the match area perimeter on the Referee's side and where the Judges are unsighted.

TWO AKA, ONE MIENAI
If after Yame, two Judges signal a score for Aka and the other Judge signals Mienai, can the Referee give a score to AO?

The rules state that the Referee cannot go against two Judges unless he has the positive support of the other Judge. Mienai is not positive support because it indicates that the Judge did not see a scoring technique. Therefore the Referee has no support and must ask the Judges to reconsider their decision, indicating why he thinks they should do so.

RE-CONSIDERATION

The Referee may ask the Judges to re-consider when “…he believes them mistaken, or when implementation would be a violation of the rules.” However re-consideration should be asked for only once. If the Referee’s request is not supported then the majority decision must be given.

CLARITY OF SIGNALS
To avoid confusion Judges should give only one signal at a time. If a technique fails to score it is not required to indicate why in the first instance. The correct procedure is to cross and uncross the flags (Torimasen). Signals such as “blocked”, “missed”, etc., should be given only if and when the Referee asks for re-consideration. In order to avoid unnecessary mistakes and requests for re-consideration all three Judges must indicate their relative opinions when the Referee stops the match and returns to his position.

JOGAI
Judges must remember that when indicating Jogai they are required to tap the floor with the appropriate flag. When the Referee stops the bout and returns to his position they should then indicate a Category 2 infringement.

RECONSIDERATION PROCEDURES FOR JUDGES
When the Referee asks for re-consideration the Judge must first consider the Referee’s request. However should the Judge disagree then he should indicate his reason why and then re-confirm his original decision.

If the Judge believes in retrospect that the Referee was in a better position to see or interpret the action then he may change his decision in support of the Referee.

When a Judge knows that there were two techniques but could see only one actually reach the scoring area but nevertheless is sure that his decision is correct he should indicate “Mienai” for the Referee’s choice then re-confirm his own choice.

When a Judge knows that there were two techniques but could see only one actually reach the scoring area and believes that the Referee’s choice was first (the Judge could see the contestant’s body action but not actual arrival at the scoring area) then the Judge should indicate “Mienai” for the Referee’s choice and not indicate a score for the other. This indicates no preference and no vote and gives responsibility to the Referee to resolve the situation.

INDICATION OF RULES INFRINGEMENTS
For Category 1 infringements Judges should first circle the with the appropriate coloured flag then extend the crossed flags to their left for Aka, putting the red flag in front, and to their right for AO, putting the blue flag in front. This enables the Referee to clearly see which competitor is regarded as the offender.

 

 

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APPENDIX 4: SCOREKEEPERS MARKS

 

__

 

Sanbon

Three Points Score

__

 

Nihon

Two Points Score

Ippon

One Point Score

 

 

 

Kachi

Winner

X

Make

Loser

Hikiwake

Draw (Tie)

 

 

 

C1W

Category 1 Foul — Warning

Warning without Penalty

C1K

Category 1 Foul — Keikoku

One Point to Opponent

C1HC

Category 1 Foul — Hansoku Chui

Two Points to Opponent

C1H

Category 1 Foul — Hansoku

Disqualification

 

 

 

C2W

Category 2 Foul — Warning

 

C2K

Category 2 Foul — Keikoku

One Point to Opponent

C2HC

Category 2 Foul — Hansoku Chui

Two Points to Opponent

C2H

Category 2 Foul — Hansoku

Disqualification

 

 

 

KK

Kiken

Forfeiture

 

 

 

S

Shikkaku

Serious Disqualification

 

 

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APPENDIX 5: LAYOUT OF THE KUMITE COMPETITION AREA

rules - APPREX4

 

MEASUREMENTS OF KUMITE COMPETITION AREA

rules - measurements

 

 

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APPENDIX 6: LAYOUT OF THE KATA COMPETITION AREA

Three Judge layout
 

rules - KATA LAYOUT

 

Five Judge layout

rules - KATA LAYOUT2

 

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APPENDIX 7: THE COMPULSORY KATA LIST

SCHEDULE OF W.K.F. COMPULSORY (SHITEI) KATA



Goju         Seipai
               Saifa

Shoto      Jion
               Kanku Dai

Shito        Bassai Dai
               Seienchin

Wado       Seishan
               Chinto
 

 

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APPENDIX 8: W.K.F. MAJOR KATA LIST

MAJOR KATA LIST OF THE WORLD KARATE FEDERATION

  • GOJU-RYU KATAS
  • WADO-RYU KATAS

 

 

1. Sanchin

1. Kushanku

2. Saifa

2. Naihanchi

3. Seiyunchin

3. Seishan

4. Shisochin

4. Chinto

5. Sanseru

5. Passai

6. Seisan

6. Niseishi

7. Seipai

7. Rohai

8. Kururunfa

8. Wanshu

9. Suparimpei

9. Jion

10. Tensho

10. Jitte

 

 

SHOTOKAN KATAS

1. Bassai-Dai

12. Jion

2. Bassai-Sho

13. Sochin

3. Kanku-Dai

14. Nijushiho Sho

4. Kanku-Sho

15. Goju Shiho-Dai

5. Tekki - Shodan

16. Goju Shiho-Sho

6. Tekki - Nidan

17. Chinte

7. Tekki - Sandan

18. Unsu

8. Hangetsu

19. Meikyo

9. Jitte

20. Wankan

10. Enpi

21. Jiin

11. Gankaku

 

 

SHITO-RYU KATAS

1. Jitte

22. Naifanchin Shodan

2. Jion

23. Naifanchin Nidan

3. Jiin

24. Naifanchin Sandan

4. Matsukaze

25. Aoyagi (Seiryu)

5. Wanshu

26. Jyuroku

6. Rohai

27. Nipaipo

7. Bassai Dai

28. Sanchin

8. Bassai Sho

29. Tensho

9. Tomari Bassai

30. Seipai

10. Matsumura Bassai

31. Sanseiru

11. Kosokun Dai

32. Saifa

12. Kosokun Sho

33. Shisochin

13. Kosokun Shiho

34. Kururunfa

14. Chinto

35. Suparimpei

15. Chinte

36. Hakucho

16. Seienchin

37. Pachu

17. Sochin

38. Heiku

18. Niseishi

39. Paiku

19. Gojushiho

40. Annan

20. Unshu

41. Annanko

21. Seisan

42. Papuren

 

43. Chatanyara Kushanku

 

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APPENDIX 9: THE KARATE-GI

karategi

 

Tue 1, Nov 2005 16:47:00 by Fraser | Comments(0)

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